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Dr Teresa YC Ching

  Senior Research Scientist, National Acoustic Laboratories, Australia

Teresa YC Ching, PhD is head of Rehabilitation Procedures research at the National Acoustic Laboratories, Australia. Her current research focuses on investigating efficacy of early intervention for populations of children with bilateral hearing loss or unilateral hearing loss, identifying factors affecting outcomes, evaluation of sound detection and discrimination in infants with hearing loss or auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder using cortical auditory evoked potential (CAEP) measurements and parental reports, and prescription of hearing aids and electric-acoustic stimulation (bimodal fitting) for children and adults. Teresa has published more than 120 peer-reviewed manuscripts. Key contributions from her original research findings include a validated test of functional performance; evidence-based protocols for bimodal fitting, pediatric referral for cochlear-implant-candidacy, CAEP and functional assessments for management of permanent childhood hearing impairment; and methods for predicting language outcomes of infants with hearing loss. She is regularly invited to deliver key note presentations at international conferences. She serves on the editorial boards of three international journals. 
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Effectiveness of early intervention for improving population outcomes of children with congenital hearing loss

Friday 8 July | 4.00pm

Ching, Teresa YC1,2, Dillon, Harvey1,2, Button, Laura1,2, Seeto Mark1,2, Marnane, Vivienne1,2, Cupples, Linda3, Leigh, Greg2,3, Cowan, Robert2.

1 National Acoustics Laboratories (NAL), 2HEARing CRC, 3 RIDBC Renwick Centre (Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children/The University of Newcastle), 3 Macquarie University

Abstract: Permanent childhood hearing loss has a major negative impact on children's developmental outcomes, at high societal costs. Despite the widespread implementation of universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS), there was no high-quality evidence on the effectiveness of early intervention for improving language outcomes, at a population level. To address the evidence gap, we conducted the Longitudinal Outcomes of Children with Hearing Impairment (LOCHI) study (www.outcomes.nal.gov.au).

Methods: The study includes about 450 children born with hearing loss between 2002 and 2007 in New South Wales, Queensland and Victoria in Australia. They were diagnosed through either UNHS or standard care, but received the same post-diagnostic, free, expert audiological services. The children's outcomes were assessed at multiple intervals.

Results and Discussion: The measurements by 5 years of age demonstrated a clear advantage of early intervention for improving language outcomes, at a population level. Early functional performance measured by the PEACH was a significant predictor of language outcomes at 5 years.

Conclusions: By streamlining clinical pathways for children with hearing loss to ensure early fitting and early referrals for cochlear implants, many more children with congenital hearing loss will have access to the same life-opportunities as would be available to typically developing children.

Acknowledgement: This project is partly supported by Award number R01DC008080 from the National Institutes on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. The project is also partly supported by the Commonwealth of Australia through the Office of Hearing Services, and through the establishment of th HEARing CRC and the Cooperative Research Centres Program.

 

Developing an evidence base for the management of children with unilateral hearing loss: the CUHL study

Saturday 9 July | 9.00am

Despite early detection of congenital unilateral hearing loss (UHL) via universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS), there is a lack of evidence on the efficacy of early intervention (in the form of device fitting) for improving outcomes; and the benefits vs harms of early detection and treatment is uncertain. Consequently, there is clinical equipoise concerning whether children should receive amplification (as well as surveillance).

In this lecture, the current status of evidence will be reviewed, and findings from a survey of clinicians will be presented. Under the HEARing CRC, NAL is conducting a prospective study to investigate the efficacy of early fitting on outcomes of children with unilateral hearing loss (the CUHL study). In parallel, we are also conducting a retrospective study to assess outcomes of children with unilateral hearing loss at school age, and to identify factors influencing their outcomes. We have launched the CUHL website (www.cuhl.nal.gov.au), where we provide resources for families and professionals. The studies will contribute to evidence-based management of childhood unilateral hearing loss in future.

Acknowledgement. We acknowledge and thank the generosity of Aussie Deaf Kids, Boystown Hospital, Hands and Voices, iCommunicate, and the Shepherd Centre for sharing their resource material and allowing access to them via the CUHL website.

This project is partly supported by Award number R01DC008080 from the National Institutes on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. The project is also partly supported by the Commonwealth of Australia through the Office of Hearing Services, and through the establishment of th HEARing CRC and the Cooperative Research Centres Program.


 


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